Konstantin Tsiolkovsky

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More about Tsiolkovsky:
Rocket Men: Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky
Tsiolkovsky: Sixteen Stages of Space Exploration
Science Fiction and Science

Rocket Men: Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky

Wiki TsiolkovskyKonstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky was born in Russia in 1857. The fifth of eighteen children, Tsiolkovsky first imagined a place without gravity when he was 8. It was a small hydrogen-filled ballon that rose to the ceiling each time he let it go that excited his imagination. Tsiolkovsky’s mother taught him to read and write. Before he entered his teens, his life took a turn that would forever alter his path.

As Tsiolkovsky wrote later, ” Age of 10 or 11, the beginning of winter, I rode a toboggan. Caught a cold. Fell ill, was delirious. They though I’d die but I got better, but became very deaf and deafness wouldn’t go. It tormented me very much.” The reality of a profound hearing loss a the time and in the area that Tsiolkovsky lived meant that his opportunities for education were extremely limited. He needed to depend upon himself to set goals and seek knowledge on his own.   Continue reading

Tsiolkovsky: Sixteen Stages of Space Exploration

Wiki TsiolkovskyRussian Rocketman Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky, truly a “Citizen of the Universe,” introduced these Sixteen Stages of Space Exploration in 1926. He believed that these incremental steps would bring man into space and allow him to thrive:

  1. Design of rocket-propelled airplanes with wings.
  2. Progressively increasing the speeds and altitudes reached with these airplanes.   Continue reading

Science Fiction and Science

The development of rocket technology is a story of international accomplishment. Three men, working independently in three different countries, were at the forefront of liquid-fueled rocket development. All three did their work at the start of the 20th century, yet none of them knew of the others’ work in time to use that work in his own investigations.

  • One of these “rocket men” was Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky of Russia. Born in 1857, he was the fifth of 18 children. Intrigued as a child by the way a small hydrogen-filled balloon rose to the ceiling each time he let it loose, as an adult he was determined to reach and live in space.
  • Robert Goddard was the American rocket man. Born in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1882, he  was 17-years old when he decided he would find a way to ascend to Mars.
  • Hermann Oberth, born in 1894 in Romania, of German nationality, designed his rocket to work in stages. He also worked on research projects for Germany in the late 1930’s.

What did these three men have in common?    Continue reading

Mice and Monkeys in Space

This 1953 United States Air Force video shows the first mice and monkeys to journey to 37 miles above the Earth.

SOURCE: Video from airboyd.tv

Sam the Space Monkey: Not the First

sam02Sam the Space Monkey happens to be a favorite of mine. He’s the Rhesus monkey who took a spin on Little Joe 2 as part of the Mercury program back in the early 60′s. He obviously had no choice, yet to me he has always been a hero.

Turns out, Sam wasn’t the first animal to risk life and limb in the pursuit of scientific knowledge. The Montgolfier Brothers used animals in a lighter-than-air flight demonstration before King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette at Versailles on September 19, 1783. They weren’t about to send a human aloft because they had no idea what would happen to a human at altitudes as high as 1,500 feet. Wait! There’s more!

Sam the Space Monkey

Remember Sam? The Rhesus monkey who took a spin on Little Joe 2 as part of the Mercury program back in the early 60’s? Here he is, before and after the flight, showing off his model of the Mercury fiberglass contour couch. Wait! There’s more!

Fluid Dynamics!

Welcome to Fluids in Motion. I know. An entire blog about fluids in motion and the application of the principles of fluid dynamics? If that sounds like a topic that will be used up in five posts or less, there’s a lot you have to learn!

Fluid dynamics is the study of fluids – gases, liquids, and the air – in motion. It’s been a field of interest for centuries. It influences the design of ocean, air, and space craft to this day.

It’s a fascinating area of science, filled with interesting characters. You’ll discover applications in nature – as well as those made by humans.

I hope you’ll stop by often to read my posts. For more information on any topic, check out my book.

Gina

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